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Vital Signs

SQUAMISH VITAL SIGNS 2017 REPORT

Squamish Community Foundation is pleased to share with you Squamish Vital Signs 2017. This report would not be possible without the help of many dedicated members of our Board, staff and volunteer committee. This report is the third Vital Signs we have produced (the other two were in 2011 and 2014). The 2017 version reports on 11 key quality of life indicators and showcases where we are excelling as a community and where we can improve. It is meant to act as a road map for the non-profit community, the business sector, government, and the community at large in order to create positive change and improve quality of life for all residents.  A massive thank you to all who played a role in creating this report.

To view the 2017 Vital Signs report

select below:

 

http://squamishfoundation.com/media/Squamish Vital Signs 2017.pdf

What is Vital Signs?

Vital Signs is an annual community check-up conducted by community foundations across Canada that measures the vitality of our cities, identifies significant trends, and assigns grades in at least ten areas critical to quality of life.

Each city's report card data is a compilation of numerous research sources, much of it local, that help communities make connections between issues and trends in different areas. The findings are presented in a reader friendly format to make them as accessible as possible.

How it Works

  • Collate broad range of data. Community foundations develop a distinctly broad picture of the community using relevant national data and identifying local research on a wide range of subject areas.
  • Engage the community: Vital Signs reflects the community because it involves the community at every level, from determining the report's indicators and exploring research sources, to assigning grades.
  • Publish research you can read! Community foundations are committed to publishing a reader-friendly document that appeals to a wide range of readers looking for a snapshot of quality of life and of community vitality.
  • Issue areas - Each foundation collects data in at least 10 shared issue areas such as health, the environment, education, work, health and wellness.

Community foundations are well-suited to this kind of work because of the broad role we play in our communities. Community foundations work with a wide range of community groups - not just one charity or sector. This gives us a comprehensive view of local issues and the ability to make connections between various needs and issues.

Measuring the vitality of Canadian communities in critical areas will help community foundations:

  • Increase the effectiveness of our grant making
  • Better inform our donors about issues and opportunities in the community
  • Assist us in making connections between individuals and groups to address those issues